Unlocking the Healing Powers of Cannabis: Terpenes Mimic Cannabinoids and Boost their Effects

Terpene Belt Farms
Terpene Belt Farms

Cannabis sativa is a plant that contains many compounds with medicinal properties, including phytocannabinoids and terpenes. While phytocannabinoids have been studied extensively, less is known about terpenes and their potential interaction with phytocannabinoids. The “entourage effect” is the hypothesis that terpenes can modulate the activity of phytocannabinoids and produce unique therapeutic outcomes.

A study published in Scientific Reports aimed to investigate the functional and modulatory actions of terpenes both alone and in combination with a cannabinoid agonist. The results showed that certain terpenes can have direct interactions with cannabinoids, producing poly-pharmacological effects and modulating cannabinoid activity. This suggests that terpenes could be used to enhance the therapeutic properties of cannabinoids and reduce unwanted side effects. Overall, this study provides insight into the potential of terpenes as a powerful tool to improve cannabinoid therapy.

Key results:

  • Terpenes can cause certain behaviors in mice that are similar to those produced by cannabinoids.
  • Terpenes can reduce pain sensitivity in mice, and this effect is enhanced when combined with cannabinoids. The pain reduction seems to be mediated by a specific cannabinoid receptor.
  • Terpenes can lower body temperature in mice, and this effect is also enhanced when combined with cannabinoids. However, the mechanism behind this effect is not fully mediated by the cannabinoid receptor.
  • Terpenes can cause a state of rigid posture in mice, and this effect is partially enhanced when combined with cannabinoids. The mechanism behind this effect seems to be mediated by a specific non-cannabinoid receptor.
  • Terpenes can decrease movement in mice, and this effect is partially enhanced when combined with cannabinoids. The mechanism behind this effect seems to be mediated by a specific non-cannabinoid receptor, as well as the cannabinoid receptor.
  • Linalool, one of the terpenes studied, appears to have different effects on male and female mice.
  • In lab experiments, terpenes were found to activate a specific cannabinoid receptor.

Read the full study here.

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